fuckyeahfluiddynamics
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Clean-up of accidents like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill can be complicated by what goes on beneath the ocean surface. Variations in temperature and salinity in seawater create stratification, stacked layers of water with differing densities. When less dense layers are on top, the fluid is said to be stably stratified. Since oil is less dense than water, one might assume that buoyancy should make an oil plume should rise straight to the ocean surface. But the presence of additives or surfactants in the oil mixture plume can prevent that. With surfactants present, an oil mixture tends to emulsify, breaking into tiny droplets like a well-mixed salad dressing. Even if the density of the emulsion is smaller than the surrounding fluids, such a plume can get trapped at a density boundary, as seen in the photo above. Researchers report a critical escape height, which depending on the plume’s characteristics and stratification boundary, determines whether a plume escapes or becomes trapped.  (Image credit: R. Camassa et al.)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Clean-up of accidents like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill can be complicated by what goes on beneath the ocean surface. Variations in temperature and salinity in seawater create stratification, stacked layers of water with differing densities. When less dense layers are on top, the fluid is said to be stably stratified. Since oil is less dense than water, one might assume that buoyancy should make an oil plume should rise straight to the ocean surface. But the presence of additives or surfactants in the oil mixture plume can prevent that. With surfactants present, an oil mixture tends to emulsify, breaking into tiny droplets like a well-mixed salad dressing. Even if the density of the emulsion is smaller than the surrounding fluids, such a plume can get trapped at a density boundary, as seen in the photo above. Researchers report a critical escape height, which depending on the plume’s characteristics and stratification boundary, determines whether a plume escapes or becomes trapped.  (Image credit: R. Camassa et al.)

distant-traveller

child-of-thecosmos:

The Very Large Telescope (VLT) is a telescope operated by the European Southern Observatory on Cerro Paranal in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. The VLT consists of four individual telescopes, each with a primary mirror 8.2 m across, which are generally used separately but can be used together to achieve very high angular resolution. The four separate optical telescopes are known as Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun, which are all words for astronomical objects in the Mapuche language. The telescopes form an array which is complemented by four movable Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of 1.8 m aperture. (Wikipedia)

Have you ever wondered what’s it like to be inside these telescopes? DeepSkyVideos on YouTube gives us very informative video walkthroughs for all four telescopes: UT-4UT-3UT-1, and UT-2.

(Image and footage credits: ESO VLT Page, SpaceRip)