beardycarrot

beardycarrot:

At ten days old. the tadpoles ate carrots for the first time yesterday.

…I just uploaded a video of tadpoles eating pulped carrots frozen in the shape of a palm tree set to Thai music… Yeah, no, nothing weird about that.

Music: Nong Mai - ‘Carrot Song’

utcjonesobservatory
utcjonesobservatory:

Earths Water Is Older Than The Sun: 
Since water is one of the vital ingredients for life on Earth, scientists want to know how it got here. One theory is that the water in our solar system was created in the chemical afterbirth of the Sun. If that were the case, it would suggest that water might only be common around certain stars that form in certain ways. But a new study, published today in Science, suggests that at least some of Earth’s water actually existed before the Sun was born — and that it came from interstellar space. 
That’s certainly something to ponder the next time you drink a glass of water. But the discovery is also cool because it means water — and maybe life — may be ubiquitous throughout the galaxy. 
“If water in the early Solar System was primarily inherited as ice from interstellar space, then it is likely that similar ices, along with the prebiotic organic matter that they contain, are abundant in most or all protoplanetary disks around forming stars,” study author Conel Alexander explained in a press release. 
The researchers concluded that a significant portion of Earth’s water came from interstellar space by looking at the relative abundance of hydrogen and deuterium. 
Deuterium is like hydrogen’s heavier brother. Both atoms have one proton in their nuclei, but deuterium contains an extra neutron, and it mostly forms under special conditions. In interstellar space, for example, water ice contains lots of deuterium, thanks to the freezing cold temperatures and ionizing radiation. Earthly water contains some deuterium, too, but in low quantities — up to 30 times less than interstellar water. 
Looking at a water sample’s ratio of hydrogen to deuterium can tell you about what conditions were like when the water formed. But until now, scientists weren’t sure whether Earth’s deuterium came from space, or whether it was cooked up in the birth of the Sun. 
To find out, researchers used mathematical models to virtually recreate the young solar system’s protoplanetary disk — the cloud around the newborn Sun. They found that, based on the temperature and radiation conditions that would have existed back then, it wasn’t possible for the young solar system to create the ratios of hydrogen and deuterium that scientists observe in Earth’s oceans and on comets. Because of that, the researchers estimate that anywhere between 7 and 50 percent of Earth’s water had to have come from the interstellar medium in which the solar system was born.
And since other solar systems would have formed in the same interstellar medium, the findings suggest that the origins of water on Earth were not unique, and that the thirst-quenching, life-supporting substance may be common on exoplanets throughout the galaxy.

utcjonesobservatory:

Earths Water Is Older Than The Sun:

Since water is one of the vital ingredients for life on Earth, scientists want to know how it got here. One theory is that the water in our solar system was created in the chemical afterbirth of the Sun. If that were the case, it would suggest that water might only be common around certain stars that form in certain ways. But a new study, published today in Science, suggests that at least some of Earth’s water actually existed before the Sun was born — and that it came from interstellar space. 

That’s certainly something to ponder the next time you drink a glass of water. But the discovery is also cool because it means water — and maybe life — may be ubiquitous throughout the galaxy. 

“If water in the early Solar System was primarily inherited as ice from interstellar space, then it is likely that similar ices, along with the prebiotic organic matter that they contain, are abundant in most or all protoplanetary disks around forming stars,” study author Conel Alexander explained in a press release

The researchers concluded that a significant portion of Earth’s water came from interstellar space by looking at the relative abundance of hydrogen and deuterium. 

Deuterium is like hydrogen’s heavier brother. Both atoms have one proton in their nuclei, but deuterium contains an extra neutron, and it mostly forms under special conditions. In interstellar space, for example, water ice contains lots of deuterium, thanks to the freezing cold temperatures and ionizing radiation. Earthly water contains some deuterium, too, but in low quantities — up to 30 times less than interstellar water.

Looking at a water sample’s ratio of hydrogen to deuterium can tell you about what conditions were like when the water formed. But until now, scientists weren’t sure whether Earth’s deuterium came from space, or whether it was cooked up in the birth of the Sun. 

To find out, researchers used mathematical models to virtually recreate the young solar system’s protoplanetary disk — the cloud around the newborn Sun. They found that, based on the temperature and radiation conditions that would have existed back then, it wasn’t possible for the young solar system to create the ratios of hydrogen and deuterium that scientists observe in Earth’s oceans and on comets. Because of that, the researchers estimate that anywhere between 7 and 50 percent of Earth’s water had to have come from the interstellar medium in which the solar system was born.

And since other solar systems would have formed in the same interstellar medium, the findings suggest that the origins of water on Earth were not unique, and that the thirst-quenching, life-supporting substance may be common on exoplanets throughout the galaxy.

nprbooks
nprbooks:

Happy International Coffee Day!
Ah, and how splendidly a good book and a cup o’ joe go together. In honor of this day, here are a few things books have taught us about coffee …
Bitter by Jennifer McLagan:
The amount of bitterness in coffee comes less from the presence of caffeine than it does from the method of brewing and roasting the beans. 
Coffee for Roses by C.L. Fornari:
This one’s for the coffee-lovin’ gardeners out there: The old wives’ tale that coffee grounds work wonders for growing roses isn’t exactly true. Sure, it’s not a bad thing — but it’s not necessarily special, either; any organic material as fertilizer will do.
Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World by Mark Pendergrast:
The introduction of coffee had a “sobering up” effect on the Western world, as the previous drink of choice was most often booze (morning beer soup was actually a thing). 
While it acted as an intellectual and creative stimulant — the French and American Revolutions were planned in coffeehouses, Pendergrast says — it was also a symbol of colonialism. Europeans spread the growth of coffee bean trees, but often used slaves to do it. 
In America, the events surrounding the Boston Tea Party (as well as cost difference) may have caused the adoption of coffee over tea. John Adams even wrote in a letter to his wife that he’d have to swap beverages for patriotic reasons.
-Intern Bita
Image via Your Coffee Guru

nprbooks:

Happy International Coffee Day!

Ah, and how splendidly a good book and a cup o’ joe go together. In honor of this day, here are a few things books have taught us about coffee …

Bitter by Jennifer McLagan:

  • The amount of bitterness in coffee comes less from the presence of caffeine than it does from the method of brewing and roasting the beans.

Coffee for Roses by C.L. Fornari:

  • This one’s for the coffee-lovin’ gardeners out there: The old wives’ tale that coffee grounds work wonders for growing roses isn’t exactly true. Sure, it’s not a bad thing — but it’s not necessarily special, either; any organic material as fertilizer will do.

Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World by Mark Pendergrast:

  • The introduction of coffee had a “sobering up” effect on the Western world, as the previous drink of choice was most often booze (morning beer soup was actually a thing).
  • While it acted as an intellectual and creative stimulant — the French and American Revolutions were planned in coffeehouses, Pendergrast says — it was also a symbol of colonialism. Europeans spread the growth of coffee bean trees, but often used slaves to do it.
  • In America, the events surrounding the Boston Tea Party (as well as cost difference) may have caused the adoption of coffee over tea. John Adams even wrote in a letter to his wife that he’d have to swap beverages for patriotic reasons.

-Intern Bita

Image via Your Coffee Guru

mindblowingscience
afro-dominicano:

Eastern Veil

Distance: 2,600 light years away

The Eastern Veil (NGC 6992) is a supernova remnant that is part of a larger complex that includes the Western Veil (NGC 6960).  It is estimated that the supernova explosion occured about 10,000 years ago, before the age of recorded history.  During a star’s life, nuclear fusion produces elements such as oxygen, silicon, carbon, and iron.  These elements are expelled into space during supernova explosions, later to become part of other stars, planets, and lifeforms like ourselves.

Copyright: Martin Pugh

afro-dominicano:

Eastern Veil

Distance: 2,600 light years away

The Eastern Veil (NGC 6992) is a supernova remnant that is part of a larger complex that includes the Western Veil (NGC 6960). It is estimated that the supernova explosion occured about 10,000 years ago, before the age of recorded history. During a star’s life, nuclear fusion produces elements such as oxygen, silicon, carbon, and iron. These elements are expelled into space during supernova explosions, later to become part of other stars, planets, and lifeforms like ourselves.

Copyright: Martin Pugh

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

William’s Dwarf Gecko (Lygodactylus williamsi)

Also known as the turquoise dwarf gecko, or the “electric blue gecko”, William’s dwarf gecko is a critically endangered species of gecko (Gekkonidae) which is endemic to a 8km2 (3 sq miles) area of the Kimboza Forest in eastern Tanzania. William’s dwarf geckos are only known to occur on the (endangered) screwpine Pandanus rabaiensis, where they will feed on insects, and drink nectar/water from its leaves. 

Lygodactylus williamsi is currently listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, as it faces major threats from over-collection for the international pet trade, and from the habitat loss/fragmentation of its already small range. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Lacertilia-Gekkota-Gekkonidae-Gekkoninae-Lygodactylus-L. williamsi

Images: Esther Bock and WingedWolfPsion

23pairsofchromosomes

sixpenceee:

A graduate student has created the first man-made biological leaf. It absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant. He did this by suspending chloroplasts in a mixture made out of silk protein. He believed it can be used for many things but the most striking one is the thought that it could be used for long distance space travel. Plants do not grow in space, but this synthetic material can be used to produce oxygen in a hostile environment. (Video)